Proats Recipe: Cap’n Crunch Berries Protein Oatmeal

Proats Recipe: Cap’n Crunch Berries Protein Oatmeal

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If you’re unfamiliar with proats, you’re in for a treat. Proats, or oatmeal with protein powder added in after cooking, is a fantastic breakfast option for the health conscious eater. Oats are extremely filling and contain great amounts of fiber and other nutrients. Add the protein to the mix, and you only amplify those things. But I get it, oats are kinda boring. That’s why this proats recipe puts some fun back into your breakfast with arguably the best cereal of all time, Cap’n Crunch.

And by arguably, I mean it’s the best cereal of all time.

A Few Things to Know About Making Proats

As you probably guessed, most of the protein in a proats recipe comes from the protein powder itself. There’s nothing wrong with that, but there is a limit as to how much powder you can add to proats without making them dry and inedible. So if you’re looking to add more protein to a recipe, you can use egg whites instead of milk.

Here’s a recipe I put together for Stronger U Nutrition demonstrating how to incorporate egg whites into a proats recipe (click to see the second image and recipe graphic):

Using egg whites is a great way to balance out the protein to carbs ratio in yours proats recipes. In case you’re wondering, the egg whites change the texture a bit, but they don’t really add any flavor. So don’t knock it ’til ya try it!

Another common question about making proats is about the type of oats used. I like using quick oats because they cook very quickly in the microwave. You can use old fashioned or steel cut oats, but they’ll require a bit more time to cook and maybe slightly different amounts of liquid. Other than that, there’s not much difference.

And finally, you can make most proats recipes as overnight oats. Though I wouldn’t recommend making this one as overnight oats due to the cereal’s tendency to get soggy. If you were going to go that route here, I’d add everything else to a jar or resealable container and adding the cereal right before eating.

This proats recipe pairs Cap'n Crunch Berries with real berries and 29 grams of protein per bowl. Who says kids cereal can't be part of a healthy diet?
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Cap'n Crunch Berries Proats

Putting the fun back into breakfast with this high protein spin on protein oatmeal. 

Course Breakfast
Cuisine American
Keyword proats
Prep Time 3 minutes
Cook Time 2 minutes
Total Time 5 minutes
Servings 1 Bowl
Calories 340 kcal
Author Mason Woodruff

Ingredients

  • 1/4 C (20g) Quick Oats
  • 1/2 C (120mL) Unsweetened Almond Milk
  • 3/4 C (26g) Cap'n Crunch Berries
  • 1 scoop (34g) Protein Powder vanilla
  • 1/4 C (35g) Mixed Berries I used frozen blackberries, raspberries, strawberries, and blueberries

Instructions

  1. Add the oats and milk to a mug or small bowl. Microwave for 90 seconds.

  2. Place the cereal in a resealable bag and crush with the backside of a knife, rolling pin, or other blunt object. You can also use a blender or food processor. 

  3. Add the crushed cereal and protein powder to the cooked oats. Stir well. 

  4. Top with berries and optional cereal if desired. (If you're using frozen berries, you may want to heat them up for 30 seconds or so.)

Recipe Notes

  • If you're wanting overnight oats, add everything else to a jar or resealable container and add the cereal right before eating. 
  • Use any type of oats you like, but you may have to adjust liquid/cook time. 
     
Nutrition Facts
Cap'n Crunch Berries Proats
Amount Per Serving (1 Bowl)
Calories 340 Calories from Fat 54
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 6g 9%
Total Carbohydrates 44g 15%
Protein 29g 58%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

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This proats recipe pairs Cap'n Crunch Berries with real berries and 29 grams of protein per bowl. Who says kids cereal can't be part of a healthy diet?



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